Words Matter Wednesdays: A Series on Advancing Equity Through Language

Father Talking To Son

Please join us for a series this May that will explore equitable terminology that promotes social justice for populations where language has often been used to shame individuals, patronize, enforce prejudice, or limit visibility. Each session will provide updated language that helps advance equity within their population of focus. Each session will be an hour total, with 15 minutes reserved for Q &A. We encourage behavioral health professionals and those who interact with or write about these individuals, including those leading other Centers of Excellence, Technology Transfer Centers, and others administering programs aimed at increasing access to mental health care to attend. Together, we hope to move forward in advancing equity through language.

Overall series: Learners will be able to
• Identify language that is unhelpful to five populations of focus
• Identify updated language that helps advance equity for five populations of focus
• Utilize effective language to promote equity among five populations of focus

May 1: Promoting Equity when Speaking About, and with, Families
• Identify language that is unhelpful to families
• Identify updated language that helps advance equity for families
• Utilize effective language to promote equity among families

May 8: Promoting Equity for Black and African American Populations
• Identify language that is unhelpful to Black and African Americans
• Identify updated language that helps advance equity for Black and African Americans
• Utilize effective language to promote equity for Black and African Americans

May 15: Promoting Equity for Older Adult Populations
• Identify language that is unhelpful to older adults
• Identify updated language that helps advance equity for older adults
• Utilize effective language to promote equity for older adults

May 22: Promoting Equity for LGBTQIA2S+ Populations
• Identify language that is unhelpful to LGBTQIA2S+ individuals
• Identify updated language that helps advance equity for LGBTQIA2S+ individuals
• Utilize effective language to promote equity for LGBTQIA2S+ individuals

May 29: Promoting Equity for Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander (AANHPI) Populations
• Identify language that is unhelpful to older AANHPI individuals
• Identify updated language that helps advance equity for AANHPI individuals
• Utilize effective language to promote equity for AANHPI individuals


GET MORE INFORMATION AND REGISTER HERE


Organized by the National Family Support Technical Assistance Center

The NFSTAC is led by the National Federation of Families, a family-run organization, in partnership with the Partnership to End Addiction and Boston University. The Center’s approach is anchored by the underlying principle that families play a vital role in supporting their loved ones and are the experts regarding their family support needs. The National Family Support Technical Assistance Center (NFSTAC) supports families whose children experience mental health and/or substance use challenges across the lifespan by offering resources, technical assistance, and training to the workforce, organizations, and communities that support them.

Falling behind and forgotten: The impact of acculturation and spirituality on the mental health help-seeking behavior of Filipinos in the USA

AAPA’s Division of Fillipinx Americans (DoFA) presents:
PAGTUKLAS: Filipinx American Psychology Research Seminar
Falling behind and forgotten: The impact of acculturation and spirituality on the mental health help-seeking behavior of Filipinos in the USA

Do you or your family believe in the kapre or engkanto? What about the practice of arbularyo or kulam? What are these concepts from the Filipino culture, and are they important for mental health help-seeking in Filipino Americans? Hear about recent empirical research involving Indigenous Filipino spiritual beliefs and practices and the impact of this work on the presenter’s journey of reconnecting to her Filipino roots. Join us for an opportunity to connect with each other and have a community conversation about spirituality, healing, and honoring our ancestors. Please familiarize yourself with their research paper for a more more enriching discussion: Falling behind and forgotten: The impact of acculturation and spirituality on the mental health help-seeking behavior of Filipinos in the USA.

Presenter/Researcher: Jacqy Lopez, MA, MHA
Moderator: Gregory Desierto, Psy.D.
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Appropriate Audience for this event:
Mental Health Professionals who provide services to Filipinx communities
Students, Academics and Professionals who conduct Psychology, Sociology, Race/Ethnicity, and Filipinx research
Psychologists, Psychotherapists, Psychiatrists, Counselors, Social Workers, Spiritual Leaders, and Healers
Filipinx communities who are interested in understanding mental health help-seeking behaviors of Filipinx individuals and communities


MORE INFORMATION AND REGISTRATION HERE

Burmese History, Cultural, and Mental Health Support

For several decades dating back to the 1940s to present-day Burma has been suffering numerous conflicts such as wars and coups within the country causing uprising tension and problems for the people young and old fearing for safety, not being able to live flourishing lives whether it’s obtaining everyday resources, bringing in a good amount of income and opportunities and also children lacking education as it comes in the lowest forms of qualities. Due to these issues naturally, people seek safer lives for themselves and their families. These people have no choice but to flee with nothing on them to neighboring countries such as Thailand, China, and India. Some can go to third countries such as the United States, Canada, Australia, etc., When these people arrive here, they are faced with many new problems that are quite different from their homeland. They are faced with a language barrier; it is a huge adjustment as they leave everything they know behind.

Burmese refugees and immigrants must take the blocks and rebuild a new life here and learn all about the U.S. system and laws thus we feel the need to help all these people learn to adjust well and maneuver around the trauma. The Burmese Community Services was established in 2013, Buffalo NY as a nonprofit organization and a Certificate of Incorporation with the Department of State to exactly assist this growing community providing resources and services such as interpretation, assisting with housing, health care projects, funeral services, education, transportation, food and consumers, labor and employment opportunities and much more.

What will participants learn?

  • A deeper dive into the benefits our organization has to offer
  • The history, traditions, and rich culture of Burma
  • Different ethnic groups and languages spoken
  • A deeper understanding of specific social issues and problems regarding Burmese refugees and immigrants

Who is this workshop for?

  • This is for all service providers and researchers including government agencies.

Looking to receive continuing education contact hours?
Papa Ola Lōkahi (NASWHI-CEP-13) has been designated an approved provider of social work continuing education contact hours by the National Association of Social Workers Hawai’i Chapter. The Papa Ola Lokahi maintains responsibility for the program. This program is approved by the State of Hawaii Department of Health’s Alcohol and Drug Abuse Division (Approval# ADAD-24-085) for up to 1.5 contact hour(s). NOTE: Participants are responsible for submitting proof of attendance to their respective certification or licensing board. ʻOhana CoE & Papa Ola Lōkahi do not submit this information on behalf of training participants.

Participants will receive a link to verify attendance at the end of the workshop.


Download slides here

Download the Burmese Community Behavioral Health Survey

This event has passed. You can watch the replay on our YouTube, or here on the website.


Workshop Presenters

Mr. Steven Sanyu was born in Burma/Myanmar and now resides in Buffalo since 2000 Mr. Steven founded the Burmese Community Services, Inc., (BCS) in 2013, and it became 501(C)(3) the first Burmese people to lead an Independent non-profit organization in WNY to assist refugees and immigrants with issues they are facing including but not limited to language barriers, cultural adjustment and to provide other services and resources.

As a community leader, Mr. Steven have been involved with many organizations and Institutions in the Buffalo Region such as Colleges and Universities, the Buffalo Police Department’s Language Access Plan, the WNY Refugee Health Summit Planning Committee, Community Advisor for the University at Buffalo Food Systems Planning and Health Communities Research Lab (UB Food Lab), the Buffalo Region Refugee and Immigrant Roundtable’s Steering Committee and the Advisory Board Member of the City of Buffalo Common Council’s Police Oversight Committee, etc.

Mr. Steven share experiences and give Cultural Competency training and give presentations to the Court, Colleges and University, Law Enforcement Training Academy, Schools, and Health Care Agencies including the IRS and more for better services, and understanding of refugees, and the immigrant population including interviews and radio shows. Mr. Steven also assist the Buffalo Police Department to develop the “Language ID Card” for non-English speakers in the city of Buffalo and lastly working together with County Legislators and partner organizations to pass the Language Access Law in Erie County.

Mr. Steven currently serving as a President of Burmese Community Services, a Member of the WNY COVID-19 Vaccine HUB Advisory Committee and Ambassador to the New York State Vaccine Equal Task Force, Member of the Erie County’s New Americans Advisory Committee, the Buffalo State University President’s Community Advisory Committee, and the Buffalo State’s AFP Advisory & Engagement Committee.

For those reasons, the Burmese Community Services (BCS) received the Community Leader Organization Award from the NFJC and also from the NYS Senator Timothy Kennedy and the Erie County Legislature in 2018, and recognition from the U.S. Census Bureau in 2020.

Mr. Steven also received awards and recognition for “Extensive Work and Leadership in the
Development of the Buffalo Police Department’s Language Access Plan” by the City of Buffalo Mayor Byron W. Brown in 2016, the “Standardized Patients in Inter-Professional Education” by the University at Buffalo, Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences in 2017, “First recipient of the International Community Day Award Winner” by the City of Buffalo Mayor and the BPD Commissioner in 2021 (BPD C-District), and the recently, the City & State media has recognized as a “One of the Asia American‘s most Influential 100 leaders in New York State” in 2022.

Problem Gambling: A Hidden Addiction among Asian American Communities

Flier for Problem Gambling

Gambling encompasses diverse cultural practices and modern forms like casino gambling. In the Asian American community, factors like cultural acceptance and targeted marketing contribute to its prevalence. Problem gambling, as defined by DSM-5, affects individuals despite adverse consequences, with neuroscience revealing addictive pathways similar to substance use disorders. Treatment options include behavioral therapies, cognitive interventions, and pharmacological approaches tailored to subtypes like behaviorally conditioned and emotionally vulnerable. Resources like helplines, state-funded programs, and support groups offer assistance. A case vignette will prompt discussions on the challenges of gambling addiction, emphasizing the need for comprehensive support systems and empathy in addressing this complex issue.

In this workshop, participants will:

  • Gain an understanding of problem gambling, with a particular focus on its components within the Asian American community.
  • Gain an understanding of the neuroscience behind gambling addiction.
  • Explore treatment approaches for gambling problems among Asian Americans
  • Learn about ways to support Asian American families and individuals who may be struggling with gambling addictions.
  • Learn about different resources available.

Looking to receive continuing education contact hours?
Papa Ola Lokahi (NASWHI-CEP-13) has been designated an approved provider of social work continuing education contact hours by the National Association of Social Workers Hawai’i Chapter. The Papa Ola Lokahi maintains responsibility for the program. This program is also approved by the State of Hawaii Department of Health’s Alcohol and Drug Abuse Division (Approval# ADAD-24-075) for up to 1 contact hour(s). NOTE: Participants are responsible for submitting proof of attendance to their respective certification or licensing board. ʻOhana CoE & Papa Ola Lōkahi do not submit this information on behalf of training participants.

Participants will receive a link to verify attendance at the end of the workshop.


Download the slides here

This event has passed. You can watch the replay on our YouTube, or here on the website.


Workshop Presenters

Michael Liao’s career in social work has spanned various settings—including child welfare, domestic violence prevention, supervised visitation, mental health, and substance abuse treatment. Michael is currently the Director of Programs for NICOS Chinese Health Coalition. Since 2004, Michael has been providing cultural responsiveness training on a wide range of topics, including implicit bias and widening our personal lens, cross-cultural communications, Asian American cultural issues, LGBTQ+ issues, and anti-oppressive practices, for a wide variety of audiences.

Navigating Boundaries and Empathy with Patients from a Similar Race/Ethnicity

WHAT: Join us through improvisation and acting together in a virtual skit, “Navigating Boundaries and Empathy with Patients from a similar race/ethnicity,” followed by an interactive discussion with our panelists on addressing these scenarios.

WHO: Healthcare professional trainees interested in AAPI mental health, cultural differences in the clinical setting, or theater!

WHEN: 3/11/24 at 7-8:30 pm EST

INCENTIVE: If you complete the webinar, pre-survey, post-survey, provide an institutional email, and is your first time participating in an Acting Together webinar, you may be eligible for a $20 non-monetary gift card. If you also participate in a 1 hr long qualitative interview after the webinar, you will get an additional $30 non-monetary gift card.

WHAT TO EXPECT: Please be aware this is a very interactive and engaging webinar. Participation includes improv exercises, acting, and sharing experiences in a supportive space.

Contact [email protected] for any questions about the event or if you would like to get involved with Acting Together.


REGISTER

Piecing The Puzzle of AANHPI Mental Health: A Community Analysis of Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander Mental Health Experiences in California

Research continues to suggest that Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders (AANHPIs) have some of the lowest rates of using mental health services compared to other groups — even amid histories of discrimination and rising fears of hate crimes in recent years.

What keeps more AANHPIs from seeking mental health care? Is it because even in their diversity, AANHPI communities share a common thread of cultural resilience?

Researchers from the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research (CHPR) and AAPI Data will discuss their new study of this long-standing disconnect, which combines California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) data disaggregated by various AANHPI subgroups paired with contextual and historical analyses and recommendations drawn from community leaders.

This novel approach allowed the researchers to account for the profound impacts the psychological toll from the pandemic and legacies of discrimination have had across generations of AANHPI communities.

By disaggregating data for a number of key AANHPI subgroups, they learned important information that could help lawmakers craft policy that does a better job reaching the people who need it.

Speakers will also share key insights about what tailoring mental health for AANHPI communities could look like to get more people the help they need.

American Counseling Association Conference and Expo 2024

Join Us in NOLA for the Must-Attend Event for Counselors!

Get ready to be energized and inspired while connecting with leading experts and peers from around the country at the ACA Conference & Expo, taking place April 11 –13, 7:00 AM-6:00 PM Central Time, in New Orleans.

This year’s theme — Pause, Prepare, Provide — focuses on curating a space for reflection, connection and learning among the counseling community. With thought-provoking presentations, enlightening discussions, networking and meaningful opportunities to advocate on behalf of counselors and clients, you’ll refresh your skills, discover innovative approaches to your work and engage with colleagues who understand your day-to-day challenges.

Come to pause for yourself, prepare to serve, and provide for our profession’s future.


REGISTER

Novel Digital Interactive Theater-based Intervention to Promote Empathy, Mental, and Emotional Wellbeing Among AANHPI Communities

Yale Compassionate Home, Action Together (CHATogether) is a novel community-based digital program that promotes empathy and emotional wellness through interactive theater (Song J, 2022). Using interactive theater adopted from the Theater of Oppressed, we aim to promote empathy and communication skills among AANHPI children, adolescents, and families.

Components of the Yale CHATogether program will be introduced. Participants will learn about the five stages of skit production including topic identification/collaborators, scene planning, improvisation, writing, and community engagement. We will also share our qualitative study to measure impacts of theater-based intervention in AANHPI communities.

We will live perform a theatrical vignette depicting challenging communication within AANHPI family. First, the problematic scenario will be presented. Second, a child psychiatrist will provide moderation to process and to mentalize the perspectives of teen and parent. Third, actors re-do the scenario after incorporating more effective communication skills leading to a modified outcome. With facilitator guidance, audience will then divided into breakout room to meet and share their experiences related to the skit.

What will participants learn?

  • Participants will learn about components of Yale CHATogether and the five stages of theater production.
  • Participants will learn about skills in parenting, communication, and relational well-being tailored towards AANHPI families.
  • Participants will learn about resources in culturally informed mental health care in AANHPI.

Who should attend?

  • General populations, especially for parents.
  • Educators.
  • Mental health providers working with AANHPI individuals.

REPLAY

This event has passed. You can watch the replay on our YouTube, or here on the website.


QUESTIONS FROM THE CHAT

There were many questions asked during the workshop, and the replies to those answers are provided below from the presenters. PLEASE NOTE: the answers below do not serve as medical or psychiatric advice. The audience should seek help directly from your local professional providers.

When you do the theatre, do you do only one scene or several scenes?
Since its inception, CHATogether has created 26 skit videos shared on Youtube. Each video tailored towards different scenes and mental health topic in the family. Sharing the Youtube channel here:
https://www.youtube.com/@compassionatehomeactiontog1212/videos

What to do if the person with mental problem doesn’t want to seek help?
This depends on the severity of the mental health. If it is not a psychiatric crisis, caregivers may provide a non-judgmental approach to actively listen to and understand the person’s needs. “Not motivated to get help” could be a sign or symptom of depression, rather than a behavior or attitude that is commonly misunderstood.

Who is your audience when you do the Forum Theatre? Are these providers? Or community people?

Our CHATogether community events outreach to a wide range of audience, including community parents/caregivers, educators, youth (teens and college students), church goers, and interprofessional mental health providers.

How do you identify a mental illness?

Diagnosing mental health condition takes a series of professional assessments from a bio-psycho-social-cultural perspectives. Using clinical psychologists and psychiatrists will make a diagnosis after a thorough assessment. Correct diagnosis is critical to guide treatment recommendations.


Workshop Presenters

Dr. Eunice Yuen is an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at the Yale School of Medicine, a Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist at Yale New Haven Hospital, and at the Parent and Family Development Program at the Yale Child Study Center. Dr. Yuen grew up in Hong Kong and is now a mother of two Asian American children, and she is the Founder and Director of CHATogether at Yale School of Medicine. Dr. Yuen is the Principal Investigator of the Acting Together Program.”

Peggy O. Wong is a second-generation Asian American who is pursuing her MSN in psychiatric-mental health at Yale School of Nursing. She recently completed a yearlong APRN internship at the West Haven VA Medical Center, and is now completing her final year of training at the Yale Child Study Center in Outpatient Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. She is interested in Immigrant and Minority mental health and to better understand the cultural variations in the prevalence, presentation, and treatment of psychiatric disorders.

Evelyn Kim is currently a high school junior at Choate Rosemary Hall. A dedicated participant in theater, she acts, directs, and writes plays. As a second-generation Korean American, she hopes to promote awareness for and aid the de-stigmatization of mental health for AAPI families through Yale CHATogether. In her free time, she enjoys volunteering for local Connecticut food banks and reading screenplays.

Skylar Luu is a fourth-year medical student at Albany Medical College in Albany, NY. Previously, she received her B.S. in Neuroscience in 2019 from Johns Hopkins University. She is applying for a psychiatry residency position this cycle, with interests in child and adolescent psychiatry and public psychiatry. She serves on National APAMSA as a Region 1 Director, with a passion for promoting the health of the AANHPI community.

Vicky Wang, B.S., is a fourth-year medical student at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. She is currently applying into psychiatry for the 2023-2024 cycle. At Vanderbilt, Vicky serves as the Co-President of APAMSA (Asian Pacific American Medical Student Association) for the second consecutive year. She is passionate and actively involved in numerous other initiatives focused on wellness, mentorship, and education.

Feiran Zhang is a postgraduate associate in the Child Study Center at Yale University, focusing on the mental health and well-being of children and caregivers in early education settings. She graduated from Columbia University in the summer of 2022 with a double master’s degree in counseling psychology. Before joining the YCSC team, she worked in the Bullying Prevention and Mental Health Promotion Lab at the University of Maryland intending to understand families’ unique experiences and ultimately promote Asian American teens and their families’ resilience and success.

References:
Song JE, Ngo NT, Vigneron JG, Lee A, Sust S, Martin A, Yuen EY. CHATogether: a novel digital program to promote Asian American Pacific Islander mental health in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health. 2022 Sep 23;16(1):76. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/36151549/